Ancient Egyptian Crowns

THE BLUE CROWN
THE BLUE CROWN

The Blue Crown was also known as the 'war crown' or the Khepresh crown.

It was probably made from cloth or leather, then painted blue. Sometimes it was decorated with golden discs and a twisting royal uraeus usually adorned the front.

It is a military helmet and is often worn during battles and hunting.

Rameses II was depicted wearing this crown in a famous painting to celebrate his victory over the Hittites.

RAMESES BATTLE WITH THE HITTITES AT KADESH
RAMESES BATTLE WITH THE HITTITES AT KADESH

It is thought that Rameses II was the Pharaoh from the story of Moses in the Bible. His reign lasted for 67 years ( 1279- 1212 BC ). He had many wives, including Nefertari, and was father to more than 100 children. He was called Rameses the Great, but much of his fame may be down to self-publicity.

After his famous battle with the Hittites at Kadesh, Rameses claimed that he, single handedly, had saved his troops from the enemy. Later, he had many paintings and texts created to commemorate his personal bravery on the battlefield.

Rameses II also left more buildings and monuments across Egypt than any other pharaoh. However, many of those that bear his name were built by earlier generations and he frequently erased the names of previous pharaohs to inscribe his own in their place.

Nevertheless his greatest achievement was the construction of the rock-hewn temple of Abu-Simbel with its four 60 feet high statues of the Pharaoh cut from the living rock. This is one of the greatest sites of Ancient Egypt.

You can click on the link or sketch above for a larger image that you may use to help you with your drawing of the Blue Crown.